Salt and Pepper Words: Scribble Samples

I'm a little dazed. We had our annual Thanksgiving dinner with the church family yesterday, and my husband and I signed up to tackle a turkey. Which means we didn't get any rest on Sunday. So I'm a little dazed. Today is technically laundry day, which means doing laundry, but so far I have managed only to wrap some Christmas presents and read in The Reformers and Their Stepchildren. Add a nap to that, and I have not had a very productive Monday, but since I missed Sunday's rest and I have elbow-room to take Monday off(ish), I'm going to think nothing of it.

So I'm going to take this opportunity to give you a peppering dosage of what I have been up to and what I have been writing, and what I have written. As Katie said about her own dosage (and she my inspiration), "they're Something, at least - and that is a good sight better than nothing."

scribbles at a glance

The second in command stiffened by his commanding officer. The wind kicked the commander's plume to one side, streaming it out like the tail of a horse in full gallop. Rhodri was silent. A sound, an irregular clink and rattle, drew Adamant's gaze upward. Over the central building flew the flag of Faerie: a great red banner, tattered at the edges, but still blood-red, with a black, hollow-eyed raven rampant on the crimson. The metal weight of its sheet was swaying in the wind and banging an uneven tattoo against its pole. They must listen, she thought. Then, I am so hungry.
Adamantine

He shook his head, and her words seemed to have only driven him farther away than ever. "It is uncommon grace that Eikin needs, and God has not given me any sort."
Adamantine

Rupert’s image was all sleepy power and there was a light laugh in his voice when he replied. “I know full well where I stand in your heart, Skander. Did you not throw down this obstacle of a wife in front of me because of it? But though you may dislike me, take me not for a blackguard.”

“I’ll take you as you are,” said Skander coldly.
Plenilune

Behind them on the sidewise-blowing wind came the sound of Skander’s hunter and the two dogs coming back to them; with them on the wind came the thin, high scent of late-blooming heather. Down there in that garth that two years ago and for three years had been Rupert de la Mare’s Manor, thought Margaret with a sudden and inexplicable touch of sadness, they would be making perry out of the little brown half-rotten pears of the little brown half-wild pear trees.
Plenilune

How poorly you have sketched my nature!” she said with a flippant and caustic tone. “I have no objection to balls and parties. What is the point of shining if there is no sky to shine in?”
Plenilune

He appeared that morning, not in grim costume to reflect the fate of Plenilune laid out on the blade of a sword, but in a jacket of sparkling white, pristine, supple, comfortable, and stitched with bravado.
Plenilune

and lastly, a quote which is not mine

Christians are not distinct from the rest of men in country or language or customs. For neither do they dwell anywhere in special cities of their own nor do they use a different language, nor practice a conspicuous manner of life. . . But dwelling as they do in Hellenic and in barbaric cities, as each man's lot is, and following the customs of the country in dress and food and the rest of life, the manner of conduct which they display is wonderful and confessedly beyond belief. They inhabit their own fatherland, but as sojourners; they participate in everything as citizens, and endure everything as foreigners. Every foreign country is to them a fatherland and every fatherland is foreign.
The Epistle to Diognetus

8 ripostes:

  1. Hurrah for Skander - he's a brick! I like that line of his. I'm a little befuddled about this line, in the fourth quotation: "...Down there in that garth that two years ago and for three years had been Rupert de la Mare’s Manor..." What are you saying about the years?

    I may just have to steal this idea from you, who stole it from Katie. ^.^

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  2. You should steal it, because that would be fun. ^.^

    The passage that confuses you is much clearer in the full body of text, I'm afraid. What is meant that for three years Rupert held that manor, and that was two years ago. I just say all that artistically backwards. :P

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  3. Lovely as always, Jenny. I only have one question...where did you learn to write? I love your imagery...there's something C.S. Lewisian about it. :D Something that can capture uncapturable things, and tame them just enough that our feeble minds can look upon them and slightly understand. :) ~Rachel

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  4. Gallifrey. :P

    I couldn't say, Rachel. I think I've always had an affinity for writing, and a knack for it, despite the customary immature beginnings. I've always been reading and I've always been writing, and for a long time I've asked not, "What is this?" but "What is this like?" Anyone can answer the first question. We have Science and Law and Data for that kind of thing. But within the bloodstream of reality is that magical element that makes everything more than mere Material, that gives it Wonder, that gives it Meaning. So I've always been on the look-out for the lines between the stars, as it were: what is it in Nature that Nature's wind-in-the-leaves is like? the sound of the surf on the shore. I say I'm not just a writer, I'm a conjuror: it's a lot like making magic with the power of words.

    I've always say that, his faults aside, C.S. Lewis could always see things, and make you understand them. I never placed myself in that camp, so you have no idea how thrilling it is to hear you say that, Rachel. I've always wished to be able to do that too.

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  5. I am afraid there are not words to express how much I adore this:

    They must listen, she thought. Then, I am so hungry.

    And... And all of it, really. But that is nothing altogether new. Your writing is--it just is. It's too good. It's magical, if anything on this earth is. I've said so before, and I stand by my words.

    Thanks for stealing this. ^.^ And Abigail, feel free to steal it at your leisure!

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  6. Beautiful, Jenny. :D I enjoyed every bit. I've been very interested in both of these projects of yours and am delighted that you allowed us a bit of a sneak peek! :D

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  7. That's it - I can't WAIT to read Adamantine!!! It's RIGHT up my alley; the characters, even from the snippets, are *awesome*!!
    ~ Mirriam

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  8. Oh, and I must say - you said Gallifrey.
    I love this blog even more than ever. XD
    ~ Mirriam

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