"We Defy Augury."

"The readiness is all."
Hamlet

While on my trip I learned a very useful skill: writing on the run.  My five-and-a-half by three-and-a-half inch Moleskin notebook (of a lime green hue) doesn't give me a lot of bulk to counteract any joggling that comes from being on the run, but I despise writing sloppily and I needed to write, so I learned pretty quickly how to filter out the craze of New York and Boston and hone in on Plenilune, and manage such tolerably good handwriting that my notebook was once taken from me and exhibited to several members of the class who (evidently - I wasn't privy to any facts) have large, messy handwriting as an example of what handwriting in notebooks ought to be.  (I might have felt more pleased about this if I hadn't been yanked out of an otherwise fascinating imaginary world into the stark, breathless bustle of Boylston Street.)  So, while I have been gone for almost two weeks, I have been writing.  What is a world without pen and paper?  I submit that it is an unhappy world.


Oh, you’ve done very well with her.”  Skander’s tone was both sincere and bitingly caustic.  “She looked beautiful this evening—charming, assured—in that red gown she looked like a goddess.”
Plenilune 

Most of all she hated herself.  She, the victim, had been thrown into this world of crowns as a bone to be squabbled over, a pawn to be moved, a woman to be coddled, a slave to be prodded, a curse to be averted, a fate to thwart.
Plenilune

"Did you think you could play this game with us?  You are no match for my family or the quarrels that may arise among us."
Plenilune

Night had fallen low over the land.  It seemed to have heaped up so heavily in the sky that it was sinking under its own weight, groaning lower and lower over the fells.  She sat wrapped in a fine surcoat of doeskin and ermine, for the summer night was growing chill and the hushing rush of wind in the rowan-wood bore portents of rain, and watched the dark moth-wing dusk gather about them and the firefly-lights spring out of the black.
Plenilune

The old spark flashed into his face.  “You come upon a man in the dead of night like a vision, and expect a cool reply?  You might let a man collect his wits once you have dashed them out of his hands.”
Plenilune

Rupert was looking off another way: his voice came muffledly: “You know Mark Roy.  Those were Aikin Ironside and Brand, his sons.  Aikin is much like Centurion in temperament—I do not trust him, though his blade is quick to bite deep.  Brand—” Rupert looked round and peered, too, into the gloom after them to where they stood in the ring that was forming round the piles of wood.  “Brand has high sentiment and a short temper.  He knows how to be violent.  He may make a good friend.”
Plenilune

Centurion of Darkling-law,” said the blue-jay man, leaning close; “politely behind Bloodburn though he has rights enough to be first.  He is a good man, Centurion, and a seasoned warrior.” 
“Is that the measure of a man?” asked Margaret with a faint edge in her voice.
Plenilune

They opened in a blaze of glory.  There was a crack and a shock and an arch of light—from which, Margaret could not quite tell—and the two were at it with a passion, hurling spells and casting spells aside to left and right, filling the air with windblown sparks...  They were fantastic and terrible, and not altogether safe, to watch.  The elements and the full fire of wrath whirled from their hands at each other with the deftness of a juggler whirling his golden balls, but the backwash could be blinding and sometimes blows were cast wide.
Plenilune

Margaret did not remember getting to her feet.  At one moment she was seated on the edge of the bed, turned sidewise to see Aikaterine’s face, and the next she was standing before the maid, looking just a little downward into the other’s face, with her forefingers resting heavily on the white-clad shoulders.  She could feel the collar bone sharp beneath her fingertips and, at odd, punctuated moments, the soft throb of blood beneath the skin.  But it was the eyes she looked into, the almond-coloured, dark-spangled eyes that looked back demurely into her own.  There was no fear in them, but there was, perhaps, little hope, too. 
Plenilune

 I’m not a man of lies—only passing good looks.”
Plenilune

11 ripostes:

  1. Haha! I love that last bit. All of these were superb, as usual, Jenny. And I am so glad you defied NYC and Boston with your little notebook in tow--and examples of handwriting? Fascinating!

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is one of your best snip-whippet posts yet! I adored every single line!! Also, I'm very much enuoying the section of Plenilune you sent me, and you'll be sure to get a sparkling review. (Honest, but sparkling). I wish I could have gone to NYC and Boston - I've always wished to - but I'm so glad you had a good time. And your Moleskine sounds darling - I have several, of the brown-covered sort I decorate.

    ReplyDelete
  3. An unhappy world would it be indeed, if we mortals were not every-so-often treated to the breathtaking beauty your pen and paper steadily outpour. In other words: I love you.

    You know I love your description most of all, and when you post your descriptive Snippets I always look forward to the sensation of soaring, the thought "She knows," and my heart throbbing wildly within me as everything you touch upon with your pen springs to life before my eyes. But your dialogue is another kind of perfection altogether, and I loved having more of it in this post. You're a genius, Jenny. Fact.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Aah! Mirriam, you have no idea the agonies I endured choosing snippets for this session. Much of what I wrote this month (witness the section I sent you) is not ambiguous enough to post publicly. I posted this and felt I was posting the world's most boring snippets ever. (I still feel as if I posted the world's most boring snippets ever but if you like them I'm willing to roll with that!)

    I'm told I'm a genius, but I don't feel like one. I live with my own writer's block and scattered ideas and lack of chronology and spelling errors and contradictions and general stupidity, so I suppose there isn't much fear of my turning into Tony Stark no matter how much you insist on my intelligence. Sometimes I think it's all an accident. Sometimes I feel as if I'm yanking brilliance out of myself like teeth from a pig's mouth. Nope, I sure don't feel like I'm a genius.

    But I love you too. ^.^

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jenny, you know full well you cannot turn into Tony Stark. You're far too nice. I believe if you took the Avengers quiz, you would most likely be Captain America. (I took it and got Iron Man/Tony Stark; Snark without the genius. ^.^)
    And if your snippets are 'accidents,' they surely are lovely accidents and I hope you have them more often!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Jenny, your use of words, and the feelings, images and colours you convey through your words continue to amaze me. 1, 2, 4 and 5 snippets are my favourites...

    Plenilune has intrigued me to be honest... I still can't quite fathom what's it about or when/where is it set in. Is it a fantasy myth tale or is it historical? I'd love to hear more about it!

    ReplyDelete
  7. These are marvelous snippets! Your writing is very evocative, very nicely done. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well, to be honest in return, Joy, I don't want you to completely fathom what Plenilune is about. I don't want to spoil the whole thing for you when the time comes for you to read it. But I will say that it, like Adamantine its predecessor, is a case of historical fiction and fantasy (not so much myth in this case as in the case of the other story) coming together and kissing each other on the cheek. The best bone I can throw to you is that, on the historical fiction side, it is the autumn of 1844. No great importance, but it's a fact.

    Grazie, Mikazuki! Again, I felt I wasn't quite up to my normal standard on some of these pieces and my muse feels a little thwarted since I can't show you my favourite parts, as that would be giving away too much. Oh well. We all will just have to wait.

    "I hate waiting."

    ReplyDelete
  9. "Get used to disappointment."
    (I had to)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Very intriguing snippets! So interesting to read... makes the reader want to know more.

    Visiting on Snippets Link-Up,

    ~Mime~notebooksisters.blogspot.com~

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm glad, Mime! Hopefully I'll have more for next month, so if you are intrigued, just stay tuned. :)

    ReplyDelete