Your Favourite Things {From Plenilune}

“I walked in the autumn wind the other day...and it seemed the earth...was beaten out of copper like your fur."
When I have the time, I enjoy making graphic posters for Plenilune with people's thoughts and quotes about the book.  Now that many of you have read the novel, I have a proposition for you.  It is extremely cheap and a lot of fun.
tell me your favourite quote or quotes from plenilune in a comment below, and i will make a poster for them!
I will post them here on The Penslayer, and around on my other social media sites.  Grab your paperbacks and your Kindles and start flipping!
what is your favourite quote?

10 ripostes:

  1. “O, for a muse of fire!” he breathed passionately “—that I might light a generation with it in the heart-place."

    "What is strength but the will to go on? What is bravery but a hatred for that which defies you? What is courage but a love for that which you defend?”

    "You know me for a patient man, but I will hold grudges until hell frosts and my patience is not everlasting."

    I may come round with more, but don't want to steal them all from others. :) Wonderful idea, Jenny, I look forward to seeing them. :)

    ~Schuyler

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  2. "'The wall is too high to jump at present, Miss Coventry. Let's run along it for a while to see if there are any gaps in it further on." And of a similar vein, "...did I not say? - we will look for a break in the wall." Both from the Fox, of course :)

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  3. I really should have read PLENILUNE much more slowly than I did. I look forward to reading it more slowly in the future :).

    So I really only have one favourite line, and I still stop every now and then and chuckle quietly over it. Same character as all the other quotes come from:

    "...we will, by God's grace, light such a candle as shall dry our shifts a bit."

    *snort*

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  4. "Pipe clean away the azure blood, pipe away the fame, pipe away the laddie's youth and the beauty of the dame. Pipe to the old macabre dance- it's all a'one to me. Birth is had with a hefty price but death we have for free." *cough no of course I don't have that memorized whatever are you implying?*

    "How fiercely we fight for that which must die one day."

    And {even though it is hardly polite} "Oh go saddle your broomstick!"

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  5. My sister-in-law still has my copy, dash it al!

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  6. "You are one, I suppose, to know that we are not all mask and gala here."

    “To laugh,” he replied, “is the blithest weapon of those who live in the dark.”

    How familiar they all were! she thought with a sudden, inexplicable pain. How blunt and unlovely and covered in flying muck and stubble—and familiar!

    And last but not least... XD

    “We will go to the sitting room and be wealthy and lackadaisical now that I have pummelled my cousin and you have fretted on my account.”

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  7. "...hell knows I need that by my side"
    "Hell would know what you need" agreed Margaret.

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  8. "I don't understand the problem wih eavesdropping, anyway. If people don't was others to be offended, they oughtn't say cruel things at all."

    "Life is war," he replied lightly. "When you have grasped that you learn to hold life loosely between your fingers, ready to drain away like sand upon the shore. You have long since counted the cost. You are always ready to give up your life, always ready to give a defence. The glibness, " he added introspectively, "is a soldier's kind of courage."

    "Always I am left. There is no one to come to my rescue, as hapens in the stories. No one for me, no one for Plenilune."

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  9. I borrowed the book from a friend and don't have it anymore, but one of the quotes that has stuck in my mind the most is, "Oh, Margaret, what a queen you would have made."

    And also: "I am not a pawn." (I can't remember the rest of that quote verbatim- but that scene was one of my favorites.)

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  10. Anne-girl, I sing the piping song around my house...or play it. Don't ask me how I know the tune...it came with one when I read it.
    (...although not necessarily the one that Jenny had in mind when she wrote it.)

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